Caring for your baby’s gums and emerging teeth

Caring for your baby’s gums and emerging teeth

Do I need to clean my baby’s gums before his teeth come in?

Yes. Even before your baby sports his first tooth, it’s a good idea to get into the habit of wiping his gums with gauze or a soft wet washcloth during bath time.

You don’t need to use any toothpaste yet. Simply wrap the cloth or gauze around your index finger and rub it gently over his gums.

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Bacteria in the mouth usually can’t harm the gums before the teeth emerge, but it can be hard to tell when the teeth are starting to push through, so you’ll want to start early. Getting your baby used to having his mouth cleaned as part of his daily routine should make it easier to transition into toothbrushing later on, too.

How to soothe baby gums ?

Please find below a link to a video of how to take care of your baby’s gums when teething

http://www.parents.com/baby/health/baby-teeth/baby-tooth-care-tips1/#page=2

What’s the best way to soothe sore gums?

If your teething baby seems uncomfortable, consider these simple tips:

  • Rub your baby’s gums. Use a clean finger or moistened gauze pad to rub your baby’s gums. The pressure can ease your baby’s discomfort.
  • Keep it cool. A cold washcloth, spoon or chilled teething ring can be soothing on a baby’s gums. Don’t give your baby a frozen teething ring, however. Contact with extreme cold can be harmful.
  • Try hard foods. If your baby is eating solid foods, you might offer something edible for gnawing — such as a peeled and chilled cucumber or carrot. Keep a close eye on your baby, however. Any pieces that break off might pose a choking hazard.
  • Dry the drool. Excessive drooling is part of the teething process. To prevent skin irritation, keep a clean cloth handy to dry your baby’s chin. Consider applying a moisturizer such as a water-based cream or lotion.
  • Try an over-the-counter remedy. If your baby is especially cranky, acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or ibuprofen (Advil, Children’s Motrin, others) might help. Avoid teething medications that contain the pain reliever benzocaine.

Children experience teething differently – from when teeth emerge to the types of symptoms they have and how much pain they feel.

Read more on how to spot the signs that your baby is teething, so you can offer remedies to treat the discomfort… (click).

What’s the best way to brush my baby’s teeth after they start coming in?

As your child’s teeth start to appear (generally around 6 months), look for a baby toothbrush with a small head and grip suitable for your hand. (If your child is healthy and still hasn’t gotten her first tooth by the end of her first year, don’t worry – some children don’t start getting teeth until 15 to 18 months.)

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Use a tiny amount of fluoride toothpaste. To avoid giving your child too much fluoride, use a thin smear of toothpaste or a dot the size of a grain of rice.

Twice a day, gently brush on the inside and outside of each of your baby’s teeth, as well as her tongue (if she’ll let you), to dislodge bacteria that can cause bad breath. Since you’re using such a small amount of toothpaste, there’s no need to rinse.

Replace the toothbrush as soon as the bristles start to look worn or splayed.

For now, your baby’s teeth are probably far enough apart that you don’t have to worry about flossing. In fact, there’s no evidence that flossing baby teeth makes a difference. Most dentists recommend starting to floss when tooth surfaces touch and you can’t clean them with a toothbrush.

How can I tell if my baby is getting the right amount of fluoride?

Your baby’s developing teeth can benefit from a little fluoride. (The amount recommended for children under 3 is .25 milligrams per day.) This mineral helps prevent tooth decay by strengthening tooth enamel and making it more resistant to acids and harmful bacteria. Your baby can get fluoride from toothpaste, water, supplements (if necessary), and a fluoride varnish that his primary healthcare provider or dentist can apply to his teeth.

Note: In general, it’s not a good idea to give your baby water until he’s about 6 months old. Until then, he’ll get all the hydration he needs from breast milk or formula, even in

If the water you use to make your baby’s formula contains fluoride, he’ll get fluoride from his bottle feedings. Most municipal water supplies are fortified with adequate fluoride. (Call your local water authority to find out about yours).

If the fluoride content is less than .3 parts per million, ask your child’s doctor or dentist whether you should give your child a fluoride supplement. The doctor can prescribe fluoride in the form of drops that you can add to your baby’s bottle or cereal once a day. Experts don’t recommend fluoride supplements for h, which causes white spots to show up on your child’s adult teeth. This is why it’s important to use only the tiniest amount of toothpaste until your child is old enough to rinse and spit it out.

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